Jan 172013
 

“I know you like to research things, so I think you’d enjoy reading this.” – OB to mother at her postpartum visit after a cesarean, as the OB handed the mother the National Institute of Health VBAC Consensus Statement.  The OB knew the mother was hoping to have a VBAC with her next birth.

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  7 Responses to “Thoughtful Thursday! “I Know You Like To Research Things, So I Think You’d Enjoy Reading This.””

  1. This is like… my dream doctor. Actually, it’s my mom, LOL (who is a doctor just like this one). And I’ve managed to snag a dermatologist and an internist and a pair of midwives like this over the years, as well. HCPs after my own heart!

  2. This. Is. Fabulous.

  3. YEAH! Informed consent!

    Off-topic, the best doctor I ever saw was an oncologist who made a bunch of recommendations to my family member and then said, “Wait, you’re smart,” and opened a filing cabinet, pulled out photocopies of five different articles, and handed them over. “I’ve given you my recommendations, and these studies are the reasons why I recommended what I did.”

    Doctors with a love of learning also seem to love empowering their patients, and that’s awesome.

  4. Forget cloning sheep, I want ten thousand ob’s like this.

  5. Before y’all start packing and moving south, you might want to know that this isn’t the first time he’s been featured on this site, and it wasn’t on Thursday. Though without going back to look at the older posts, I think I mentioned I could come up with more thoughtful Thursday posts than negative. With all that said I do like my OB, and until Alabama revamps their ridiculous midwife laws, I would reccommend him and his practice.
    Personally I’m a big fan of statistics, research, and wanting to know why. At my postpartum appointment, I was not quite five weeks out from a failed induction and an unplanned csection that I’d barely begun to process, and a day out from my husband leaving for Afghanistan. I wasn’t in super great shape. During the appointment, I asked about his practice’s policy on VBACs, and I admitted that at that point I wasn’t sure if we had more children if I’d plan a VBAC or a repeat section. He told me that they would attend VBACs, and that there was no reason I couldn’t have a VBAC in the future if I wanted. I had wanted a drug free, as natural as possible birth, and I think he knew that I probably wouldn’t want an elective repeat once I had a chance to process things. (And now that I’m 16 weeks pregnant with our second,while he told me at my first appointment that I could schedule a repeat right then, he hasn’t tried to talk me out of planning a VBAC, and just told me he knew I knew the risks on both sides.) Before he left the room, he asked me to wait for him at the checkout desk because he wanted to get something for me to read over from his office. When he came back, he handed me the NIH VBAC report, and told me he knew I liked to research, he didn’t think I’d be able to find it online, and that he thought I’d enjoy reading it.

  6. To a lot of women, a doctor’s visit like this would feel like a wonderful dream come true.

  7. Trying for I think the fourth time to get this to post,and I apologize if I’ve managed to quadruple post.
    Before y’all start packing and moving south, you might want to know that this isn’t the first time he’s been featured on this site, and it wasn’t on Thursday. Though without going back to look at the older posts, I think I mentioned I could come up with more thoughtful Thursday posts than negative. With all that said I do like my OB, and until Alabama revamps their ridiculous midwife laws, I would reccommend him and his practice.
    Personally I’m a big fan of statistics, research, and wanting to know why. At my postpartum appointment, I was not quite five weeks out from a failed induction and an unplanned csection that I’d barely begun to process, and a day out from my husband leaving for Afghanistan. I wasn’t in super great shape. During the appointment, I asked about his practice’s policy on VBACs, and I admitted that at that point I wasn’t sure if we had more children if I’d plan a VBAC or a repeat section. He told me that they would attend VBACs, and that there was no reason I couldn’t have a VBAC in the future if I wanted. I had wanted a drug free, as natural as possible birth, and I think he knew that I probably wouldn’t want an elective repeat once I had a chance to process things. (And now that I’m 16 weeks pregnant with our second,while he told me at my first appointment that I could schedule a repeat right then, he hasn’t tried to talk me out of planning a VBAC, and just told me he knew I knew the risks on both sides.) Before he left the room, he asked me to wait for him at the checkout desk because he wanted to get something for me to read over from his office. When he came back, he handed me the NIH VBAC report, and told me he knew I liked to research, he didn’t think I’d be able to find it online, and that he thought I’d enjoy reading it.

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